Snyder Building Construction Welcomes Jason Bentley, Project Manager

Snyder Building Construction Welcomes Jason Bentley, Project Manager

November 5, 2020
Written by: Audrey Wilson

We are excited to officially announce the hire of Jason Bentley, project manager. He joins our commercial project management team focusing on mid-sized government, historic, office, museum, healthcare, specialty and complex commercial tenant improvement sectors. As a project manager, Jason coordinates the full project scope from bidding, to vendor selection and contracts, and budget/schedule oversight. He will focus on office, retail, and specialty projects within Snyder Building Construction’s portfolio.

Jason Bentley, Project Manager, Snyder Building Construction

Jason began his career as a field engineer during college and has progressively worked every role thereafter including serving as a superintendent for many years. This experience allows him to see the full construction scope from small installation details to budget and schedule oversight very clearly

“Construction has been my passion since working on projects with my grandfather as a kid,” says Jason.

Bentley earned his Bachelor of Science in Construction Management from Michigan State University and has been consistently managing projects with excellence for 15 years since. He has in-depth knowledge of meeting financial, quality, and security requirements within secured government facilities. In his most recent role in Virginia, he worked with contracting officer’s representatives and federal acquisition regulations to fulfill tenant goals of schedule, cost, quality, and security for several high-profile clients including Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, The Pentagon, and George Mason University.

Outside of work, Jason’s into anything outdoorsy and loves to restore cars and automotive antiques.

We’re excited to have him as part of the team! Welcome, Jason.

Snyder Building Construction Named 2019 BBB Torch Award Recipient

2019 BBB Torch Award Recognizes Snyder Building Construction for Commitment to Ethics

October 21, 2019
Written by: Audrey Wilson

We’re honored to announce we’ve been named winner of the prestigious 2019 Better Business Bureau (BBB) Torch Award for Ethics in the Small Business category. Hosted annually by the BBB Serving Denver and Central Colorado, the awards honor companies who demonstrate high level of personal character and ensure that their organization’s practices meet the highest standards of ethics, and consequently generate trust.

Awards criteria were based on the six Principles of TRUST!, high ethical standards developed by the BBB. These criteria included strong leadership, culture of high character, unifying the team, high competency management strategies to steer performance, honoring the intrinsic value of people, and community engagement.

“We’re humbled to receive a BBB Torch Award,” said Rich Snyder, president and founder of Snyder Building Construction. “It feels good to be recognized for doing the right thing.”

Twenty two applications were submitted for the small business category for the 2019 cycle. During review, each business was thoroughly vetted and were in good standing with the BBB. Applications were judged by an independent panel of board members and past winners.

The awards dinner was held at Infinity Park Event Center in Glendale, Colorado last Thursday, October 17, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3400 South Broadway Adaptive Reuse Project

3400 South Broadway Adaptive Reuse Project

June 5, 2019
Written by: Audrey Wilson

We are excited to announce the completion of the $1.8M renovation of the old lighting outlet in Englewood, Colorado at 3400 South Broadway. The 100-year-old building now bolsters exposed ceilings, glass storefronts, and new offices. The renovation, built by us and designed by ArcWest Architects, features significant upgrades to all levels, a new 6,750-square-foot finished office and nearly 21,500 square feet of leaseable restaurant and retail space on South Broadway.

The former lighting outlet had many other identities including Wagner’s patio furniture store and JCPenney. After a near full demolition of the interior, the renovations created open and airy leaseable space along the main level and mezzanine, along with a fully occupiable basement level.

Our team worked closely with Anchor Engineering to create structural solutions that kept the building design intent intact while providing much needed upgrades throughout. Future tenants will love the high-visibility corner with vast open structure and large amounts of natural light.

We also partnered with Colorado C-PACE and building owners Ken Fukayama of BHS properties, and Benjamin Schuessler and Jacob Cohley of Lincoln Energy to support the owners in integrating energy savings and resource efficiency into the building. Read more about this partnership at https://copace.com/retail-owner-finances-energy-savings-project-through-states-c-pace-program/.

Current tenants of 3400 South Broadway include Lincoln Energy Partners, BHS Properties, and Del Rio Royalty Company with available leasable space for future tenants.

All photography by John Johnston Photography (www.johnjohnstonphotography.com).

CrossPurpose Grand Opening Brings Together Community

CrossPurpose Grand Opening Brings Together Community

Local Artists Featured throughout Heart-of-Denver Facility

March 11, 2019
written by: Audrey Wilson

This past Sunday, CrossPurpose officially opened its doors alongside Providence Bible Church. While classes for the non-profit have been going on for a couple weeks, the grand opening marked the official opening for the community. We joined in on the festivities to celebrate! Take a peek at the photos to see how the space turned out.

CrossPurpose Together Cafe. Local artist. Photo courtesy of Snyder Building Construction

The grand opening culminated years of growth and expansion for CrossPurpose and serves as an important milestone for the organization’s unique and important work of abolishing relational, economic, and spiritual poverty through career and community development in Denver.

Aligned with its mission, CrossPurpose wanted to open a headquarters that was designed in community. The 56 walls display their values through quotations, verses, and custom community art. Chief Executive Officer Jason Janz and his team were intentional at all phases of the design process to feature diverse voices, input and leadership for the overall design aesthetic, layout and artwork. As a place-based organization, all of the art is from Denver-based artists. The new facility displays the art of inmates, historic residents, and children.

CrossPurpose Entry Mural. Art by Denver muralist Leti Tanguma. Photo courtesy of Snyder Building Construction

“We are thrilled to provide a place for the voices of our neighborhood artists to be seen and heard,” said Jason Janz, chief executive officer of CrossPurpose.

On the construction side, this 16,000 square-foot, tenant improvement project included new glass-enclosed offices featuring all DIRTT systems, spacious classrooms, a community café, and airy sanctuary. Both café and sanctuary show off beautiful wood cloud ceiling elements.

Matt Redick was the senior project manager on the job and Johnny Jones took the reins as superintendent. Together they truly delivered a wonderful space in collaboration with our friends at CrossPurpose. In Matt’s words, “It was an absolute pleasure working alongside the CrossPurpose team on this project. There’s a great deal of satisfaction for us bringing new life to a building that will allow this wonderful organization to serve the community.”

Entrance to Providence Bible Church. Photo courtesy of Snyder Building Construction

The interior remodel was developed by Principal Architect Michelle Miller, AIA, Interior Designer Annie Pratt, and 3D Graphics and Production Lead Ron Sieh of Jigsaw Design (www.jigsawdesignllc.com). Michelle recognized early on “the team at Cross Purpose had a clear vision for a space that was inviting and spoke to the culture and heritage of the people in the NE Denver community, whose lives are being benefited by the services that the non-profit provides. We worked closely with them to make this vision a reality through the use of color, pattern, texture and art.”

CrossPurpose art wall. Various local artists. Photo courtesy of Snyder Building Construction

We love working with businesses and nonprofits alike who are dedicated to building up our Denver community. We’re looking forward to what great things are in store for CrossPurpose.

Got something in the works? We’d love to know how we can help!  Email us at info@snyderbuilding.com.

Bars, Restaurants, and Breweries, Oh my! — Bonus: A Construction Guide to Bars & Breweries

A Three-Part Construction Series

September 19, 2018
collaboration by: Audrey Wilson, Kyle Duce, Loy Maierhauser

Building a happy bar requires the marriage of two important ideas: the overall vibe and the flow. This might just sound like today’s hipster mindset, but in all reality these two ideas are essential to the perfect bar. Think of vibe as the overall vision and concept, or how guests experience the space and place. And flow is all about functionality and efficiency for stronger service and, of course, increased sales.

To understand what that means, we asked a couple of experts. Meet Kyle Duce (he owns Tap Station and Locol in West Seattle, while running Crafted Solutions, a hospitality F&B consulting company, here in Denver) and Loy Maierhauser (a Certified Cicerone, co-founder of Fermentana, LLC, and Tasting Room Manager at MAP Brewing Company in Montana). We sat down with these two and asked some pointed questions so you can have a head start in planning your own bar or brewery.

    
Kyle Duce (left) & Loy Maierhauser (right)

At Snyder Building Construction, we typically build what’s already been drawn and developed, but understanding bar operations should be the starting place for designing (or redesigning) any new bar or brewery. And during the construction phase, we’re always there to help you build it better, find ways to save money, and keep the project on schedule.

Q&A

What should people consider when building a bar that would allow it to operate more smoothly?

  • Kyle: More dry storage / liquor room space! Keeping back up items in an easily accessed storage room will help maintain the clean aesthetic and design of the original concept while allowing for bulk purchases that make a huge difference in bottom line profit.
  • Loy: The bar’s physical design! I love the idea of seating around the whole bar, but you end up with a really challenging fishbowl effect. I know it’s nice to have the additional seating at our bar, but you end up with people trying to catch our bartenders’ attention from all directions, and it can be a bit challenging for them.  We’ve definitely had to troubleshoot the flow issues.

Keep in mind, many jurisdictions require liquor storage to be locked and any plan reviewers will want to understand where this storage is located. Overhead storage may have separate code requirements and fire, life/safety want to know storage won’t block any alarms or sprinkler heads. Consider also that cold beer likes to stay cold and wine is often temperature regulated. As such, plan carefully how you will store your canned/bottled beer and wine supply both behind the bar and in back-up storage.

What are the top three keys to consider when building your new bar?

  • Kyle:
    1.  Clearly identify your concept and vision.
    2.  Never sacrifice functionality over aesthetics.
    3.  Flow of service behind the bar – set up wells to service guests fast and efficiently. Make sure high volume items are easily accessed and the draft system is centrally located. Have a dishwasher close to the service well. Create a work flow based off a busy night that’s efficient for bar staff to move and create a seamless night of service.
  • Loy:
    1. Vibe – What do you want people to FEEL when they walk in? What’s your ideal vibe?  Build it.
    2. Flow – How do you envision people moving through your space? For example, are you going to have a host, or let people wander in on their own?  How are you going to let people know how to flow through your space?  Signage, furniture, staff?
    3. Logistics of your tap lines – This might be obvious, but long beer lines can be challenging to deal with. Long, glycol-chilled lines can still end up causing issues and can be tricky to troubleshoot. Typically, the shorter the line, the easier to deal with, and easier for your staff to change kegs and keep the flow of beer coming quickly on busy nights.

All of these ideas center on planning and designing. Tap line logistics are huge! Shorter tap lines are absolutely easier and keep the beer colder overall. Tap lines aren’t just for beer anymore either. Consider also cold brew, wine, and sparkling water. Signage and furniture won’t go in until the end or even after construction – but many times signage and furniture have long lead times so you’ll likely want to get things ordered and settled at the beginning of construction.

What questions do you for a contractor have about bar construction before you get started?

  • Kyle:
    • Once the bar budget for fixtures and equipment are in place, what is the protocol if budget gets exceeded throughout the build out?

Great question. We always recommend adding a 5% contingency line to your overall budget for this reason! But the heart of this question depends on a couple things. Was this an unforeseen condition or a change to the contract documents? If so, these additions typically move forward as change orders. How costs are managed depends on the agreement with your contractor. Have you set up a hard bid or negotiated job with them? Additional costs are always run by the owner first, however, some changes may be required your jurisdiction which would be required to earn a certificate of occupancy to open the business.

  • Do you have a portfolio of previous bars & restaurants that you have completed? It’s always good to see the work the contractor has completed and what they are capable of.

This is a great tip. Always ask about previous experience! Our team has run the gamut, from multi-million dollar brewery campuses to hole-in-the-wall, local joints.  We’ve got local recommendations for everything from draft systems to bar tops to back-of-building delivery set-ups.

  • What are realistic time frames for every major stage of the build out? How has that been met in the past with previous concepts?

For projects roughly 2,500-5,000 SF in size you’re looking at about 12-14 weeks of construction time. You’ll want to add surveying, planning, architectural design and construction document drawings, permitting, etc… to get a true sense of your timeline. This could add anywhere from 8 to 12 weeks on the front end. Additionally, the exterior signage process has its own permitting and timeline process outside of the construction timeline through local zoning departments.

The 12-14 week construction portion will run somewhat like this: 1-2 weeks for underground plumbing and electrical; 3 weeks for framing/MEP rough-ins; 3 weeks equipment installation/overhead work; 4-6 weeks for paint, tile, lighting, and finishes throughout.

Note, permitting jurisdictions will not allow you to move in furniture or train staff in the space until a health inspection and final building inspections are completed. Consider this timing when building out your opening operations plan!

What are your biggest lessons learned from bar set-up / construction?

  • Kyle: Never cut costs on the importance of good materials and equipment that will withstand the high volume of wear and tear. Consider a durable bar top, reliable refrigeration, and quality draft system. Also, create a highly detailed budget and be prepared to make cuts within the budget, having backup finishes and fixtures in place if needed.
  • Loy: Get some experienced bartenders and servers in to look at your plans and building. Even if builders or owners have some experience in the industry, it’s typically years in the past, and having the people who will ACTUALLY be moving through your space look at it and help you troubleshoot things and generate ideas will be invaluable.

We agree! Partnering with industry folks who have been down this road is the best way to go. They can help you get started on the right foot and follow you through to the end.

For more bar and brewery inspiration, check out: www.hospitalitydesign.com, www.architecturaldigest.com, www.rejuvination.com, www.frankarchitecture.ca

Read part I of the series: The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Restaurant: A Guide for New Owners.

Ready to learn more and get to work with us? Email info@snyderbuilding.com or call us at 720.900.5082.







Meet Johnny Jones – Snyder Building Construction’s Newest Superintendent

Meet Johnny Jones – Snyder Building Construction’s Newest Superintendent

April 18, 2018
by: Audrey Wilson

Johnny Jones, Superintendent

We’re thrilled to bring on Johnny Jones as our newest superintendent! He’s already hit the ground running with our retail and restaurant sector.

Johnny started his career in construction in his late teens. He’s worked in everything from tenant finish to ground up with stints in carpentry and worked his way up to be a superintendent, a position he’s now held for nearly 12 years. His hard work doesn’t go unnoticed as he’s received Project Safety Awards from the Denver Justice Center and Project Performance Awards from the Denver News Agency building.

“I want to do a great job for the client,” says Johnny. “I go in as if I’m building something for a friend. In this line of work, I’ve made clients life-long friends.”

He loves working with subcontractors, building a plan, and seeing it come through to fruition. Past projects include Cradles to Crayons, Huntington Learning Center, Andy’s Frozen Custard, Cheers Liquor Mart, and a large, pharmaceutical-grade commercial kitchen.

Johnny is a Denver native and graduate of East High School. He’s played semi-pro arena football and coached local little league for nearly ten years.